Business Technology & Digital Transformation Strategies

You are here

Technology Strategy & Implementation Insights

Boost business success via insights on emerging trends in digital transformation and IT strategy; practical frameworks you can apply; and guidance from the world’s experts in leadership, IaaS, investment prioritization, operational excellence, sustainable innovation, change management, enterprise agility, and applying emerging technologies.

Learn More »


Robert Charette
Advisor

Sorry Isn’t Good Enough: Preventing Administrative Evil

by Robert Charette

This is the third Advisor in our series on combating the scourge of administrative evil. The first in this series examined three governmental IT systems — one each from the US states of Michigan, Washington, and Rhode Island — each experiencing operational failures that caused needless harm to their respective state’s citizens. In the second Advisor, we explored the idea of how poorly managed and executed government IT systems that inflict such needless harm on their citizens can rise to the level of being administratively evil. In this final installment, we discuss ways to mitigate administrative evil.


Figure A2 — RPA software as “noninvasive.”
Executive Report

Smart Service Automation: Benefits, Cases, and Lessons

by Mary Lacity, by Leslie Willcocks

With the introduction of robotic process automation (RPA) and cognitive automation (CA) tools, potential adopters of these new types of service automation tools remain skeptical about the claims surrounding their promised business value. Potential adopters want to know why organizations are adopting service auto­mation, what outcomes they are achieving, and what are the practices that lead to achieving multiple business benefits. To answer these questions, we conducted two surveys of 143 outsourcing professionals along with interviews of 48 people, including service automation adopters, providers, and advisors. From the inter­views, we identified 20 adoption journeys. This Executive Report documents the RPA “triple win” — for shareholders, customers, and employees — emerging from the successful organizations we researched. We also detail eight RPA and CA adoption cases to show how automation was carried out, and the multiple emerging benefits. Finally, we outline 20 action principles, which other organizations can enact, to deliver such outcomes.


Figure 1 — The triple win from RPA.
Executive Summary

Smart Service Automation: Benefits, Cases, and Lessons (Executive Summary)

by Mary Lacity, by Leslie Willcocks

There has been a big escalation in the media profile of service automation over the last three years. With the introduction of robotic process automation (RPA) and cognitive automation (CA) tools, potential adopters of these new types of service automation tools remain skeptical about the claims surrounding their promised business value. Potential adopters want to know why organizations are adopting service automation, what outcomes they are achieving, and what are the practices that lead to achieving multiple business benefits.

To answer these questions, we conducted two surveys of 143 outsourcing professionals along with interviews of 48 people, including service automation adopters, providers, and advisors. From the interviews, we identified 20 adoption journeys. The benefits include doing more work with fewer humans, improving service quality, executing services quicker, reducing service costs, extending service coverage to 24 hours without shiftwork, increasing work team flexibility, increasing compliance, and, most surprisingly, increased employee job satisfaction. 


Executive Update

A New Vision for Strategy Execution

by Whynde Kuehn

Today’s organizations are constantly growing and reshaping as they implement new strategies and business model changes to react to the external world and internal pressures. While the ability to translate business direction into action is critical for any organization’s survival, most need to recognize there are significant opportunities for improvement. This Executive Update will cast a new vision upon strategy execution, an organizational capability that not only helps to ensure survival but can also be a source of competitive advantage.


Robert Charette
Advisor

Combating the Scourge of Administrative Evil, Part II

by Robert Charette

In the first Advisor in this series, we examined three governmental IT systems from the US states of Michigan, Washington, and Rhode Island. Each experienced operational failures that caused needless harm to their respective state’s citizens. In this Advisor, we argue that a strong case can be made that these failures can rise to a level of administrative evil.


Figure 7 — Model factory architecture pattern.
Executive Update

Outsmarting the Competition: Information Superiority in the Digital Age

by Borys Stokalski, by Bogumil Kaminski

While other strategies can to some extent be seen as alternatives, information superiority is different; it should be implemented in combination with any of the other options, serving as a “booster” of competitive advantage. In this Executive Update, we propose possible scenarios for the implementation of information superiority strategy, which provides relatively high sustainability without introducing too much complexity.


Article

Business Opportunities in the New Digital Age — Opening Statement

by San Murugesan

The articles in this issue present perspectives and ideas on business transformation in the digital age. We hope they will inspire and encourage you to visualize the likely future of business in your domain and to explore the opportunities it presents. Finally, we hope their insights will help you identify suitable transformation strategies and plans and, if needed, choose viable collaboration models for partnering with startups and other firms in your digital business efforts.


Article

What Models Are Banks and Insurers Adopting to Drive Digital Transformation?

by Dorota Zimnoch

The financial services sector was one of the first to be impacted by digitization, and for many years, banks (and also insurers) have been innovating their offerings to respond to the increasing demands of customers, changing regulations, and heightened competition. But the real disruption — which has changed banks’ business models and the way they interact with consumers — began with the emergence of fintech. Increasingly, small, nimble, technology-savvy companies are unbundling the offerings of traditional banks; consider online lenders that provide loans to customers who, due to strengthened credit criteria, have lost access to conventional bank loans, or remittance companies that allow customers to send money abroad at the fraction of the cost charged by banks. In recent months, the trend has been observed even more strongly in the insurance space with the rise of insurtech, which impacts the whole insurance value chain, from customer onboarding, through risk assessment, to selling the products, and finally to claims processing. Digital transformation has become inevitable, and banks and insurers are looking for the most efficient strategies for the digital age.