Industry

The status quo is changing for most industries as boundaries blur between fields due to innovation, disruption, and digitally-driven change. That’s why keeping abreast of emerging trends in sectors outside your own is vital, not only because your organization’s competitive landscape may be changing, but because there are universal, strategic lessons to learn from the opportunities and threats convergence poses for every marketplace. We examine emerging trends and the impact of evolving tech in key fields such as healthcare, financial services, telco, energy, mobility, and more to help you capitalize on the possibilities of the future while managing the challenges of today.  

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Discover how fintech can support businesses to not only reopen post-pandemic, but also to develop a robust digital infrastructure that will support growth into the future.
Higher expectations of customer service and trends in online fraud are forcing government agencies and businesses alike to modernize their digital identity management systems as more people engage with online services. As we explore in this Advisor, this includes employing applications — in the form of cloud platforms and services licensed from commercial providers — that integrate machine learning (ML), machine vision, and biometrics combined with mobile access in order to automate the verification and authentication of government-issued IDs and other documents.
The next decade in the auto industry will be intriguing to watch as the risk-reward equation between electric vehicles and internal combustion engine vehicles continually shifts. New strategic inflection points can be expected to emerge as both battery and IT improve, with the latter allowing the software-defined car to become an everyday reality.

The electric vehicle (EV) charging market stands on the threshold of disruption. The public EV charging market is still in an embryonic stage but will offer tremendous growth opportunities in the next years. By 2030, more than 50% of all newly registered vehicles will be electric, triggering a huge demand for EV charging solutions. This will, in turn, create a multi-billion dollar business.

OEMs have recognized that their current approaches of outsourcing the requisite software and electronics to suppliers and then integrating them in ICE vehicles is not workable for EVs. What's the solution?

The electric vehicle (EV) charging market stands on the threshold of disruption. By 2030, more than 50% of all newly registered vehicles will be electric, triggering a huge demand for EV charging solutions. This will, in turn, create a multi-billion dollar business. Tiny startups from the charging sphere — often backed by key utility and oil & gas players — have professionalized, have grown into serious companies and have gone public. Now the big question remains: Which players and business models will come out on top?

Joseph Byrum demystifies quantum computing. He defines quantum computing, outlines its principles, and highlights its advantages. Byrum argues that quantum computing is an emerging reality rather than hype, and that to benefit from it, we in technology and business need a mindset change.
Although the concept of a digital twin in automotive is not new, the mass deployment of embedded con­nectivity and the ability to remotely extract critical vehicle data is. As vehicle components and systems evolve from concept and design to manufacture and operation, so does the digital twin.